The Patron

As compensation for my delay this week, I am pleased to announced that the first installment of The Gevaudan Chronicles – my series of prequel shorts to The Gevaudan Project is now available. Sign Up now to download The Patron free! Excerpt is available below.


“The Devil’s agents may be of flesh and blood, may they not? – Arthur Conan Doyle

August 7, 2005

Berlin

The organisms had adapted and multiplied.

They were not unities but rather systems. Three trillion self-replicating chemical machines with again as many foreign units of the same function – themselves the product of thousands upon millions of molecular reactions, combining and recombining in continuous infinitude. Order born from chaos.

Destroying, consuming, processing, dividing, feeding upon all around them. Nature epitomized in its most merciless form – “life” itself only death by another name.

A thousand evolutionary generations had multiplied their capabilities. No longer shaped by but shaping the world around them. Blind, programmed instinct – impulse – drove them forward as it drove all else.

Defects remained. He saw a total of only three truly healthy specimens in the entire mass of one hundred twenty-six. No matter. It would be rectified in time. His impulse was to observe and to know such facts. It had taken him through an evolutionary cycle of his own. He too was no longer adapting but shaping.

Alone at his table, Dr. Leopold Van Ruys, Ph.D. sipped his glass of Pinot Noir and observed the pack of his fellow homo sapiens. The median age here was at least 45, equally divided between the sexes, which meant a high proportion were safely sterile like himself. The males were the problem. Unlike their female counterparts, they were capable of lifelong fertility, spreading their own genetic defects among an effectively limitless number of offspring. Unlike all other species, where degenerates perished quickly in the struggle for both sustenance and mates. Tools and civilization had effectively ended all advancement in human biology. The paradox of modernity.

Continued

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s